Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Editing with Google Docs

EDITING WITH A GROUP
Track changes is helpful, but what I am really amazed with lately is Google Drive. I am on several boards and on committees that use it. It is a GREAT way to share documents so that multiple people can comment or edit a document without messing up what someone else has done.

When you go to http://drive.google.com you have to sign in with a Google account. You can get one even if you do not want to use gmail. Go to https://accounts.google.com/signup/v2 and either get a gmail account or sign up with your own email address.
signing up for a Google Accountsigning up with your own email



New Google Doc


Once you have a Google account and sign in to Google Drive you can start a new document or go to a document that has been SHARED with you.

shared documents
The person who creates the document is the owner. They can share it and set the permissions for each person who it is shared with.

If you choose File - Version History you will see who revised the document, what they did and when it was done. If you don't like the revision you can return to a previous version!

It is even great when you just want to share documents, but you don't want anyone to change them. When you share the document you just mark that everyone should VIEW only. They will not have the rights to change anything, but can view the document at any time.

This is becoming a very popular way to share documents on a committee or board.

Thursday, July 22, 2010

Final Reflection

Now I am home and it is time to end this blog. I chose in this year’s not to include my last week in Jerusalem. It takes time to write things up and get pictures ready and even just to think about what might be interesting to write about. But that leaves me with a few experiences, pictures and thoughts that I think are worth sharing.

One of the important places that I visited in Jerusalem was the Church of the Holy Sepulcher, which is considered by several different religious groups to be the place where Jesus was buried and rose again. Pilgrims from all over the world travel to this spot to worship.  Priests from the Catholic, Greek Orthodox and Armenian Apostolic Churches along with several other Eastern Orthodox groups maintain the church.

While we were there a procession of Catholic priests started in one of the chapels. They chanted and proceeded around the various important parts of the church with clouds of incense. As they proceeded more and more people followed until they finally ended up at the location of the tomb.

I also noticed lots of people coming to the location of the tomb and lighting some special candles from a certain flame and then snuffing the candles out and putting them in a bag. I watched for a while and finally the Professor went and asked someone what it meant. Maybe you already know this, but candles that are lit at the site of the tomb are special and so when people come and visit they light a candle and snuff it out so that when they get home they can light it again. When they light it again at home it retains the special character of a candle lighted from the flame at the tomb.

One thing that made me sad while going through Jerusalem and especially visiting this important holy site was that my friends from Bethlehem could not easily come and visit it even though it is only 15-20 minutes from where they live. They have to apply to get permission to go there and it is often turned down. So sad. 

In Jerusalem we also visited several museums (The Shrine of the Book, Vad Yashem, The Citadel or Tower of David) that were extremely well designed and informative, walked around the ramparts of the old city, watched films at the Jerusalem Film Festival (in the heat of the afternoon), and even looked at an archaeological site on the side of the old city. 

I am glad I started out by visiting my friend Ruty and then had the great chance to stay with friends in Bethlehem. I am lucky to have a chance to get to know so many different people from different places. I hope I can be a bridge between them all.  

Final Reflection

Now I am home and it is time to end this blog. I chose in this year’s not to include my last week in Jerusalem. It takes time to write things up and get pictures ready and even just to think about what might be interesting to write about. But that leaves me with a few experiences, pictures and thoughts that I think are worth sharing.

One of the important places that I visited in Jerusalem was the Church of the Holy Sepulcher, which is considered by several different religious groups to be the place where Jesus was buried and rose again. Pilgrims from all over the world travel to this spot to worship.  Priests from the Catholic, Greek Orthodox and Armenian Apostolic Churches along with several other Eastern Orthodox groups maintain the church.

While we were there a procession of Catholic priests started in one of the chapels. They chanted and proceeded around the various important parts of the church with clouds of incense. As they proceeded more and more people followed until they finally ended up at the location of the tomb.

I also noticed lots of people coming to the location of the tomb and lighting some special candles from a certain flame and then snuffing the candles out and putting them in a bag. I watched for a while and finally the Professor went and asked someone what it meant. Maybe you already know this, but candles that are lit at the site of the tomb are special and so when people come and visit they light a candle and snuff it out so that when they get home they can light it again. When they light it again at home it retains the special character of a candle lighted from the flame at the tomb.

One thing that made me sad while going through Jerusalem and especially visiting this important holy site was that my friends from Bethlehem could not easily come and visit it even though it is only 15-20 minutes from where they live. They have to apply to get permission to go there and it is often turned down. So sad. 

In Jerusalem we also visited several museums (The Shrine of the Book, Vad Yashem, The Citadel or Tower of David) that were extremely well designed and informative, walked around the ramparts of the old city, watched films at the Jerusalem Film Festival (in the heat of the afternoon), and even looked at an archaeological site on the side of the old city. 

I am glad I started out by visiting my friend Ruty and then had the great chance to stay with friends in Bethlehem. I am lucky to have a chance to get to know so many different people from different places. I hope I can be a bridge between them all.  

Sunday, July 11, 2010

Finishing up in Jerusalem

The last place that I visited in Jordan was called Jerash. It is a huge archaeological site. We had three hours there. I was not planning on writing much about the visit, but I cannot resist mentioning a few things. One thing that Jordan has is a lot of mosaic floors. This is an example of a skinny elephant mosaic that we saw at Jerash. I think I need to create a mosaic for my patio!

The scholars that I was traveling with were amazed at the size of the site and the amount of really interesting Greco-Roman ruins there. The first picture above shows our tour guide in front of the city gate. In general we tend to think that anything east of Israel is not that important, but there is so much to find and research.


We were also entertained by a show there with Centurions, Gladiators and Chariot Races. Even though it was just a small demonstration it was helpful to see what these things were like. The announcer (in English) said that usually a legion of soldiers was 5000 men, but there were probably 25 in the show. They showed several different formations and I thought it was interesting to see how they used their shields. 



After a few days in Jordan we have arrived in Jerusalem where we will be spending about a week. While I am here in Jerusalem I am not planning on regular blogging unless I receive comments and questions. I would be more than glad to go places, find things out and take pictures of places here. I hope to be hearing from you

Finishing up in Jerusalem

The last place that I visited in Jordan was called Jerash. It is a huge archaeological site. We had three hours there. I was not planning on writing much about the visit, but I cannot resist mentioning a few things. One thing that Jordan has is a lot of mosaic floors. This is an example of a skinny elephant mosaic that we saw at Jerash. I think I need to create a mosaic for my patio!

The scholars that I was traveling with were amazed at the size of the site and the amount of really interesting Greco-Roman ruins there. The first picture above shows our tour guide in front of the city gate. In general we tend to think that anything east of Israel is not that important, but there is so much to find and research.


We were also entertained by a show there with Centurions, Gladiators and Chariot Races. Even though it was just a small demonstration it was helpful to see what these things were like. The announcer (in English) said that usually a legion of soldiers was 5000 men, but there were probably 25 in the show. They showed several different formations and I thought it was interesting to see how they used their shields. 



After a few days in Jordan we have arrived in Jerusalem where we will be spending about a week. While I am here in Jerusalem I am not planning on regular blogging unless I receive comments and questions. I would be more than glad to go places, find things out and take pictures of places here. I hope to be hearing from you

Saturday, July 10, 2010

Amazing Petra



Yesterday was a long day. We went to a place called Petra, which means rock. It has really amazing tombs carved out of huge sandstone cliffs. We walked and walked and it was hot. Some people chose to ride horses, donkeys or chariots! We didn't! We walked. You could also ride a camel, but they didn't go very far. Petra is hard to describe, so I will put lots of pictures in the blog to give you the idea. 



Petra was a thriving city of the Nabataeans who lived over 2000 years ago. They settled near what is called Wadi Musa which means Valley of Moses, because there is a spring that is thought to be the place where Moses hit the stone and water came out. This was many years before the Nabataeans lived in this area. The Edomites lived here then.

Jordan is full of so much history. Almost everywhere you go there are remains of civilizations from before the Old Testament times, the Hellenistic Period, the Byzantine Era and so much more. 

In Petra there are tombs which were carved out of the sandstone by the Nabateans. They are the local people who lived in Jordan. There is also a huge Roman Temple with columns and big blocks of stone. It was amazing to me to see things here that were similar to what I have seen at Greece, Italy and even Turkey!

Click HERE to hear the flute player in the Rock Carving
The carving in Petra is stunning. It is amazing to think that people carved this intricately into the cliffs. Our guide explained that they started from the top and then carved enough so that they had a place to stand and kept working their way on down.
 You may recognize some of the scenery from Indiana Jones movie. This area was used as a backdrop for the movie. It is perfect because it is so dramatic. There was another movie being made when we arrived. There were a lot of soldiers with fancy uniforms on milling about and waiting for their scene to start.

We did not hang around to watch what they were doing, but kept walking up to the top at the end which is called the Monastery. Once we got to the top we could actually see over the whole mountain range down to the Negev desert. 

Amazing Petra



Yesterday was a long day. We went to a place called Petra, which means rock. It has really amazing tombs carved out of huge sandstone cliffs. We walked and walked and it was hot. Some people chose to ride horses, donkeys or chariots! We didn't! We walked. You could also ride a camel, but they didn't go very far. Petra is hard to describe, so I will put lots of pictures in the blog to give you the idea. 



Petra was a thriving city of the Nabataeans who lived over 2000 years ago. They settled near what is called Wadi Musa which means Valley of Moses, because there is a spring that is thought to be the place where Moses hit the stone and water came out. This was many years before the Nabataeans lived in this area. The Edomites lived here then.

Jordan is full of so much history. Almost everywhere you go there are remains of civilizations from before the Old Testament times, the Hellenistic Period, the Byzantine Era and so much more. 

In Petra there are tombs which were carved out of the sandstone by the Nabateans. They are the local people who lived in Jordan. There is also a huge Roman Temple with columns and big blocks of stone. It was amazing to me to see things here that were similar to what I have seen at Greece, Italy and even Turkey!

Click HERE to hear the flute player in the Rock Carving
The carving in Petra is stunning. It is amazing to think that people carved this intricately into the cliffs. Our guide explained that they started from the top and then carved enough so that they had a place to stand and kept working their way on down.
 You may recognize some of the scenery from Indiana Jones movie. This area was used as a backdrop for the movie. It is perfect because it is so dramatic. There was another movie being made when we arrived. There were a lot of soldiers with fancy uniforms on milling about and waiting for their scene to start.

We did not hang around to watch what they were doing, but kept walking up to the top at the end which is called the Monastery. Once we got to the top we could actually see over the whole mountain range down to the Negev desert. 

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